Douglas Danzey | Newburyport Real Estate, West Newbury Real Estate, Newbury Real Estate

A home inspection is a crucial part of the homebuying process. At this point, a home inspector will walk through a house with you and examine the property inside and out. If a home inspector identifies underlying problems with a residence, these issues could put your purchase in jeopardy. On the other hand, if a home inspection reveals that there are no major problems with a residence, you may feel comfortable proceeding with a purchase.

Ultimately, how a homebuyer approaches a property inspection can have far-flung effects. For those who want to achieve the best-possible home inspection results, we're here to help you get ready for a house inspection.

Let's take a look at three tips to ensure you know exactly how to approach a house inspection.

1. Prepare for the Best- and Worst-Case Scenarios

Regardless of how a home inspection turns out, you need to be ready. That way, you'll have a plan in place to act quickly, even in the worst-case scenario.

In the best-case scenario after a house inspection, you likely will take a step forward in your quest to complete a home purchase. Conversely, in the worst-case scenario following a home inspection, you may rescind your offer to purchase a house and reenter the real estate market.

It also is important to remember that you can always walk away from a house sale if an inspection reveals there are significant problems with a residence. For a homebuyer, it is paramount to feel comfortable with a house after an inspection. If a home raises lots of red flags during an inspection, a buyer should have no trouble removing his or her offer to purchase a house.

2. Ask Plenty of Questions

A home inspector is a property expert who can provide insights into the condition of a residence. Thus, you should rely on this property expert as much as possible.

Don't hesitate to discuss a home with an inspector. Because if you ask lots of questions during a home inspection, you may be able to receive comprehensive property insights that you may struggle to obtain elsewhere.

3. Analyze the Inspection Results Closely

Following a home inspection, you'll receive a report that details a property inspector's findings. Review this report closely, and if you have follow-up questions about it, reach out to the inspector that provided the report.

Lastly, as you look for ways to streamline the homebuying journey, you should work with a knowledgeable real estate agent. This housing market professional can put you in touch with the top home inspectors in your city or town. Plus, if you want to request home repairs or a reduced price on a house after an inspection, a real estate agent will negotiate with a seller's agent on your behalf.

Let's not forget about the support that a real estate agent provides at other points in the homebuying journey, either. If you ever have concerns or questions during the homebuying journey, a real estate agent will respond to them at your convenience.

Prepare for a home inspection, and you can use this evaluation to gain the insights you need to make an informed homebuying decision.

Getting your home ready to sell entails quite a lot. Staging, taking photos, stocking the toiletries, and--in the case of an open house--entertaining guests. You want the visitors to your home to feel welcome and like they could live there someday.

To achieve this it takes planning and an eye for what really “works” in your home. To do this you’ll have to let go of everything you’ve made your home into and turn it into a blank slate where others can imagine it fitting their personal taste.

In this article, we’re going to give you some tips on preparing your home for an open house or showing to leave the best possible impression on your visitors.

Remove yourself from the picture

It might be sad to take down your family photos and personal effects, but imagine yourself in a visitor’s shoes. When you enter a home you’re thinking of buying, you don’t want to be distracted by what the previous family did with the home. Rather, you want to look forward and imagine your own family making a life there.


Even the most minimalistic of homeowners tend to accumulate a lot of stuff over the years. However, walking into a home filled with items is distracting from the features of the home. You want to draw people’s eyes toward the best characteristics of your home--whether that’s spaciousness or architectural features.

We suggest packing your belongings by room and renting out a storage facility while you wait to move into your new place.

Stage appropriately

Working with someone to stage your home is a guaranteed way to make sure your house looks welcoming for your guests and photos. However, if you plan on doing the staging yourself take a look at some similarly styled homes online to find out what looks good in their photos. When we furnish our homes, we do it based on our personal taste, comfort, and utility. Staged homes are about aesthetics and atmosphere.

Once you’ve finished staging, it’s time to clean up after yourself. Wipe down surfaces, polish wood, and clean the windows.

Don’t neglect the exterior

The outside of your home is as important as the inside. It will be visitor’s first impression when they arrive at your driveway. To prepare, make sure your siding and windows are clear of dirt, the lawn mowed, the gutters cleaned, and the doors freshly painted, if necessary. Sweep the driveway and remove any yard tools from sight.

Welcoming guests

Your real estate agent knows how to run an effective open house. However, here are a few key things to remember on the day your guests will arrive.

First, light a candle and use air fresheners where necessary. A neutral smell is the best option, but an air freshener is better than a bad one if there are parts of your home that are prone to bad smells.

Next, make sure the bathrooms are stocked with toilet paper, tissues, and clean towels. If yours are getting old, it could be a good time to replace hand towels altogether.

Finally, welcome your guests with a new welcome mat at the front door to make a great first impression.

In a seller’s market, you shouldn’t have a home that’s simply sitting there. If a home isn’t selling and the market is hot, something must be wrong. There are many different reasons that your home isn’t selling. Below, you’ll discover some of those issues and what you can due to remedy the problems.

You Need To Adjust Your Expectations

Many people put their homes on the market expecting high results. While it’s good to have confidence, it can be detrimental to your home sale. Great expectations can lead to an overpriced home, a lack in marketing efforts, or lowering the price of the home too late. All of these situations can be detrimental to your home sale. Research and hiring a realtor to help you with the sale can keep you organized and assist ou in staying on top of the market. 

 You Don’t Understand Home Values

If you’re selling your home on your own, you may not have priced the property correctly especially if you have no professional experience. This is where a realtor comes in. A real estate agent can do the professional market research that finds the sweet spot for a price on a home for sale. Knowing that price is one of the best ways to sell your home fast. Without a well-valued home, it could sit idle in a good market. 

Your Home Is Neglected

If you have been neglecting various projects around your home, you could find that it’s more difficult to sell your home. Buyers want the best house for the lowest possible price. Homes that have been properly maintained with the right HVAC maintenance, yard upkeep, and regular appliance services are more likely to be scooped up fast by buyers. 

Before your home even goes on the market, you should do any tasks around the house that you have been neglecting. The investment of both time and money will be worth it for you in the long term when you go to sell your home. 

The Photos Aren’t Professional

The marketing efforts used to sell a home are very important. On the top of this list is the photos that represent the house. Most home buyers begin their search online. This means the first impression that they get of your home is from pictures. If these are not well done, it could be very detrimental to your home sale. 

For good photos, be sure that you get rid of all the clutter from your space before the pictures are taken. It’s really best to hire a professional to deal with his aspect of home marketing. If you must take the photos on your own, using a better camera than that a cell phone provides can really be a step up in the picture taking process.


Did you every hear the old expression, "Trust in God, but lock your door"? Not only has that adage been passed on from one generation to the next, but it's a lyric in an old Kenny Rogers song, and you'll occasionally see it on bumper stickers. Although keeping your home safe from intruders is a serious topic, that old saying reminds us, in a humorous way, that we shouldn't take home security for granted. In addition to high tech approaches to home protection, there are also easy and inexpensive steps you can take to discourage burglars. Although many of these safety measures seem like common sense, you'd be surprised at how many homeowners forget to lock doors, leave lights on, and take other simple precautions when they're away. Here's a handful of smart steps you can take to substantially reduce the risk of having your home broken into.
  1. Make a habit of locking your doors and windows. While this piece of advice may sound like a "no-brainer," many reports of home break-ins mention an unlocked window or door as the point of entry for burglars. The first thing you can do to tighten up security and feel safer in your own home is to increase your awareness of potential threats, and emphasize to your family the importance of taking precautions. The ideal scenario involves reinforcing positive habits, without instilling a sense of fear. After all, your home should be a peaceful place where your family always feels safe and comfortable.
  2. Shine a light on the problem. You would think that everyone would leave lights on when they're not home at night, but -- for one reason or another -- many don't. Keeping your home well lit, both inside and out, is a good strategy for thwarting crime. To save money on energy bills and to avoid the appearance of always having your lights on, you can purchase inexpensive lighting timers. Leaving a radio or TV on when you're not home, or connecting it to a timer, is another way to create the illusion that someone is home.
  3. Barking dogs are a known burglar deterrent, as are "Beware of Dog" signs. The actual dogs are obviously more effective than the warning signs, but many people bring their pets to a boarding facility when they're away on vacation. One solution is to arrange for a house sitter or an on-site pet care service to stop by. If you have a trusted neighbor or family member who can feed and walk your dog while you're away (maybe, water your plants, too!), then your canine security guard can remain on duty in your absence. Many communities also have licensed and bonded pet care services that can stop by and take care of your dogs, every day, eliminating the need for your pets to be away from home.
  4. Landscaping features can be a risk factor. Be aware that high bushes and hedges can make it easier for burglars to hide while breaking into windows. Keep shrubs and branches trimmed back as much as possible to eliminate this chink in your security plan. If you're still concerned about the effect of bushes on home security, then make sure your window locks are sturdy and fully functional. Inexpensive battery-operated window and door alarms are also an option.
One method that can virtually eliminate the problem of forgetting to lock your doors and turning on lights is to have a high-tech security system installed. This technology enables you to activate locks, lights, and even thermostats from any location with your cell phone, laptop, or other mobile device. While these automated systems and monitored alarms incur a monthly service fee, the peace of mind and added control you get over your home environment is often more than worth the expense.

A persistent home seller may go above and beyond the call of duty to promote his or her residence to potential homebuyers. And as a property buyer, it is up to you to decide whether to proceed with a home purchase or walk away from a persistent home seller altogether.

Ultimately, dealing with a persistent home seller can be challenging, particularly for a first-time homebuyer. Lucky for you, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of negotiating with a persistent home seller.

Here are three tips to help you get the best results during a negotiation with a persistent home seller.

1. Learn About the Housing Market

Although a persistent home seller wants to do everything possible to find a buyer for his or her residence, it is important for a homebuyer to determine whether a residence is worth the price. As such, you should allocate the necessary time and resources to learn about the real estate market.

Look at the prices of available homes that are similar to the one that you're currently considering. By doing so, you can determine a price range for your home search.

Also, check out the prices of recently sold houses in your city or town. This housing market data will help you determine whether you're operating in a buyer's or seller's market so you can plan accordingly.

2. Establish Realistic Expectations

It is common for homebuyers and home sellers to negotiate with one another. However, it is essential to establish realistic expectations before you enter a homebuying negotiation; otherwise, a homebuyer may struggle to acquire his or her dream residence at an affordable price.

For example, a homebuyer who expects a home seller to accommodate all of his or her requests may be disappointed if a property seller submits a counter-proposal. Conversely, a homebuyer who keeps an open mind and listens to a home seller's concerns can determine the best course of action.

Also, it is important to remember that a homebuyer can walk away from a persistent home seller at any time. This means if you feel uncomfortable with the price or other terms associated with a home purchase, you can step back and restart your search for the perfect house.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you are uncertain about how to deal with a persistent home seller, don't hesitate to reach out to a real estate agent for extra help.

Typically, a real estate agent can act as a liaison between a property buyer and seller. This housing market professional will do whatever it takes to ensure a negotiation fulfills the needs of all sides. Plus, he or she can provide honest, unbiased homebuying recommendations to help you make informed decisions throughout the property buying journey.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent will answer any of your homebuying questions, at any time. This housing marketing professional understands what it takes to deal with a persistent home seller, and as a result, will do everything to help you simplify the homebuying cycle.

Ready to acquire your dream home? Use these tips, and you should have no trouble buying a house from a persistent home seller.